Posts Tagged ‘Seattle Mariners’

NIEHAUS INDUCTED INTO HALL OF FAME

July 28, 2008

DAVE NIEHAUS

Seattle Mariners announcer Dave Niehaus was among those inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday. Niehaus has been the Mariners announcer for 32 years (since the team’s inception in 1977.)

RIDICULOUSLY BAD SEASON GETS WORSE FOR MARINERS

June 24, 2008

TEAMMATES HIGH FIVE PITCHER FELIX HERNANDEZ FOLLOWING HIS SECOND INNING GRAND SLAM MONDAY

Monday star young pitcher Felix Hernandez provided the Seattle Mariners with one of the few highlights of their miserable season. In the second inning of their game against the New York Mets, Hernandez hit the first pitch from Johan Santana over the wall for a GRAND SLAM.

Not only was it the first home run ever hit by a Seattle pitcher, but Hernandez became the first American League pitcher to hit a grand slam in 37 years. The Mariners won the game 5-2.

Yet, such is the Mariners luck this season, that by the end of the game joy was quickly replaced by frustration. Within an hour of his historic home run, Hernandez ended up being carried off the field with an injury after suffering a sprained ankle. He was injured covering home plate on a wild pitch.

ERIK BEDARD IS A LOSER

June 18, 2008

SEATTLE MARINERS PITCHER ERIK BEDARD

So, do you think fired Seattle Mariners general manager Bill Bavasi is a little bitter?

After finally being let go by a disastrous Mariners team, Bavasi lashed out at the guy who is primarily responsible for getting him fired-“ace” pitcher Erik Bedard.

In an interview with columnist Jerry Brewer of the Seattle Times, Bavasi was asked about Bedard’s REFUSING to throw more than 99 pitches a game. Said Bavasi,

 

“You gotta ask him. Good luck. And he’s gonna have some stupid answer, some dumbass answer.”

 

 

Ouch! And that’s coming from the guy who mortgaged his team’s future to get Bedard and and spent the entire offseason pursuing him. The pitcher who was touted as an “ace” number one starter actually has a grand total of ONE complete game in his entire career.

Bavasi acquired Bedard from the Baltimore Orioles this spring, believing him to be the final piece of the puzzle that would lead the Mariners to a division title. Instead, the team has tanked. Seattle has the worst record in baseball and Bedard is a convenient scapegoat for the Mariners problems.

Bavasi spent the entire winter trying to pry Bedard from the Orioles. Unfortunately he succeeded. Bavasi gave Baltimore five players in exchange for Bedard including the team’s best hitting prospect (Adam Jones) and best pitching prospect (Chris Tillman). Bavasi even sent left-handed relief pitcher George Sherrill to the Orioles as a “throw-in.” All Sherrill has done is lead the American League in saves for most of the season’s first half piling up 22. That has to be particularly galling for Bavasi whose Seattle bullpen has been a disaster this year with the injury of closer J.J. Putz.

The Mariners front office envisioned Bedard teaming with young Felix Hernandez to give Seattle the top 1-2 starting pitchers in the American League. Instead, Bedard has been mediocre at best for Seattle with a 4-4 record and an ERA of 4.26.

The Bedard trade has been such a disaster that the Mariners are reportedly already looking to trade the sourpuss lefty. Bedard has even managed to piss off the usually docile Seattle media by constantly acting like a jackass to reporters.

Granted, Bedard isn’t the sole reason for the sinking of this year’s S.S. Mariners ship. On his way out the door, Bavasi ripped the current Mariners squad as “dysfunctional” and a team of “nice guys who think they are trying hard.” (see Richie Sexson)

“It’s really ironic that the person we’re missing the most is Jose Guillen,” he said. “That is the piece that was here last year is not here this year. He could do some strange things, and he did, but at the top of his agenda was to win, and if anybody got in the way of playing the game right, he had no patience with that. That was his boiling point.”

YOU’RE FIRED!

June 16, 2008

BILL BAVASI

Featuring the worst record in Major League Baseball and fresh off being swept by the Washington Nationals, the Seattle Mariners today fired general manager Bill Bavasi.

SEATTLE MARINERS MANAGER JOHN MCLAREN HAS HAD ENOUGH

June 5, 2008

&FMT=18

MARINERS THROW LESBIANS OUT OF BALLPARK FOR KISSING

May 29, 2008

SIRBRINNA GUERRERO

KOMO TV in Seattle ran a story last night about a local lesbian couple who were confronted by a security guard at a Mariners baseball game-for kissing.

Sirbrinna Guerrero, one of the women, says the couple exchanged “a peck on the lips” and were singled out by a security guard simply because they kissed each other. Guerrero says a mother sitting with her son complained to security and, as a result, they were told to STOP KISSING or leave the stadium.

Guerrero says she was called out because of her sexual orientation,

 

“The mom doesn’t want to explain to the kids why two girls are kissing. So I said ‘well, I’m not going to stop, so you’ll have to kick me out. So he said ‘so I suggest you leave then.”

Guerrero’s girlfriend denies the couple was guilty of an “inappropriate display of public affection” as the Mariners charge,

 

“We were eating garlic fries. The last thing we wanted to do was make out with each other.”

Safeco officials declined to comment on the issue.


M’S GIVE BAVASI AND MCLAREN DREADED VOTE OF CONFIDENCE

May 26, 2008

SEATTLE MARINERS GM BILL BAVASI ALREADY HAS THREE LAST PLACE FINISHES IN FOUR SEASONS

Going into this weekend’s series with the New York Yankees both Seattle Mariners manager John McLaren and general manager Bill Bavasi had reason to fear for their jobs. Now their firings appear inevitable.

The M’s were already in last place and playing horribly. Then came this weekend’s disaster. The Mariners were swept by the LAST PLACE Yankees.

Saturday team president Chuck Armstrong gave Bavasi and McLaren the dreaded vote of confidence:

“Their positions are secure,” Armstrong told MLB.com from his Bellevue, Wash., home. “They are not to be blamed for what’s going on.”

 

Unfortunately, things are getting exponentially worse by the day.

Even Armstrong is baffled by the Mariners poor play. After all, this is a team that was expected to contend for a division title in 2008 and mortgaged a significant part of their farm system to obtain Baltimore Orioles starting pitcher Erik Bedard. Bedard was supposed to be the final piece of the puzzle to put the Mariners on top.

 

“In my 23 years, I have never ever seen anything like this,” Armstrong said.

The Mariners can’t hit, the pitching is imploding, and the club plays stupid baseball day after day. Worse, they’ve lost the once loyal Seattle baseball fans. Prior to this disastrous road trip, eight of the ten poorest attended games in Safeco Field’s history have come this season. And the ordinarily docile Seattle media has turned on Bavasi like wolves.  

Bavasi took over as Seattle’s general manager prior to the 2004 season. His teams finished in last place in 2004, last in 2005, and last in 2006 before going 88-74 last season. However, another last place finish seems a foregone conclusion in 08.

As captain of this Titanic, Bavasi is bearing the brunt of the criticism. He seems genuinely baffled by his team’s inept play. A frustrated Bavasi told mlb.com,

 

“This interview is not an attack on the players…”

 

He then proceeds to attack the players,

 

“You can’t send out a memo asking them to play better, but they need to put their effort in a little different, more intelligent way and play the game right. We are not in position to be talking about wins and losses,” Bavasi said. “Unfortunately, we don’t have on this club, or so far haven’t had, that player or players who has it in his gut to take care of himself and have enough left over to help somebody else do the job, or demand it. We don’t get a runner over from second or in from third, and the players tolerate it.

“Good teams just don’t tolerate it. Sometimes, that is making demands on each other, and good teams do that. They point things out that are being done wrong and demand they do them right.”

Bavasi concludes,

 

This is beyond frustration, and it’s hard to fathom,” he said. “It’s not that we are giving in, because we’re not.”

Those may be Bavasi’s last words as Mariners general manager. Literally.

Meanwhile, at least Bavasi has been the architecht of his own demise. Mariners manager John McLaren seems to be more of a bumbling, inept accident of history.

Last year the Mariners were cruising along with a 45-33 record when manager Mike Hargrove abruptly quit the team. The same squad limped home at just two games over .500 after McLaren took over. McLaren spent decades in baseball and NOBODY ever thought he was competent enough to be a Major League manager. The M’s head job is his first.

 The 56-year-old McLaren (who talked up this squad in spring training) looks more like he’s 76 these days. And, I’m sure he feels that old. After all, he’s had to sit through EVERY Mariners game this season.

 

SEATTLE MARINERS SOON TO BE EX-MANAGER, JOHN MCLAREN

ICHIRO KNOWS HIS BASEBALL-AND BEER !

May 25, 2008

ICHIRO SUZUKI

The Seattle Mariners were picked by most experts to win the American League West this season. At the very least the M’s were expected to be a bona fide contender for a Wild Card spot in the American League. They are not.

In fact the Mariners have been a simply wretched baseball team. Following another drubbing by the last place Yankees Friday night, the Mariners fell to 18-31. That’s the worst record in baseball. The team can’t hit, has been getting increasingly poor starting pitching (supposedly the club’s strength), and looks to be just an awfully constructed mess of a ballclub.

There are rumors that manager John McLaren may be fired before the end of the weekend.

Observing this disaster has been the team’s superstar-center fielder Ichiro Suzuki. There’s an AWESOME quote by Ichiro in today’s Seattle P.I. baseball blog. Since Ichiro doesn’t give interviews to members of the English speaking media, this was actually a prepared statement,

 

Playing on this team and seeing what is happening around me, I feel that something is beginning to fall apart,” Ichiro said, through a translator. “But, if I was not in this situation, and I was objectively watching what just happened this week, I would probably be drinking a lot of beers and booing.”

“I-would-probably-be-drinking-a-lot-of-beers-and-booing,” is an absolutely BRILLIANT analysis of the situation.